“The Knocknagael Boar Stone is a large Pictish carving dating to about AD 600, dominated by the image of a wild boar. It’s emphasised by spirals and spiky bristles, and surrounded by Pictish symbols. ”

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In Norse mythology, Freyja (/ˈfreɪə/; Old Norse for “(the) Lady”) is a goddess associated with love, beauty, fertility, sex, war, gold, and seiðr. Freyja is the owner of the necklace Brísingamen, rides a chariot pulled by two cats, is accompanied by the boar Hildisvíni, and possesses a cloak of falcon feathers.

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We’re often asked the significance of the hog’s head in our family arms. This emblem has featured throughout the heraldic history of the British Isles. In particular has been a common family emblem in Scotland. Not only does the well-known Orkney boar design goes back to the Kinloch Pictish families but even further into the Roman occupation. It’s even been noted in Viking design.

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The Kinloch arms motto has been variously translated from being Honest, True, and Non-Degenerate. There’s some literary license required in how we read this but we prefer Honest, or Not Untrue. It reinforces the bedrock of the Kinloch clan believing in the strongest of defences, honor, bravery and even attack sharpened by being simply honest.

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The name Kinloch comes from the name of the barony of Kinloch, which is located at what was the head of Rossie Loch in the parish of Collessie in Fife.” – but you won’t be able to find Rossie Loch now.

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William de Kyndelloche of Fifeshire rendered homage in 1296 to England’s Edward I with his signature, along with the signatures of many other of Scotland’s nobility, on the Ragman Rolls.

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Although greatly influenced by England’s example, Scotland’s heraldic tradition also developed on its own, and there are many devices that are uniquely, and sometimes, exclusively Scottish.

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